Issue: October 2020
Uniacke Newsletter Logo
Next deadline: October 23

REHABILITATING HIGHWAY #1 - MOUNT UNIACKE

Last year we saw surveyors out on Highway 1.

Rumours ran rampant that it would finally be our turn for major road repairs. The marks they put on the road wore away as the seasons passed, and hope dimmed as the Corona virus hit. For the past several weeks we’ve watched and grumbled as culverts under the highway and our driveways were replaced. The temporary patches put in place on the highway quickly developed potholes, some of them large enough to damage our vehicles.

On Monday, August 24, the Miller Group started the next phase of the rehabilitation with equipment I hadn’t seen before. It appeared that they were recycling the pavement in place. I did a little research into the process, and talked to the crew to find out more.

The process is called "Cold In-Place Recycling(CIR)". The process basically is:

 Mill the shoulder of the lane

 Deposit cement on lane

 Mill the pavement down several inches

 Mix water and an emulsifier with the milled aggregate

 Re-pave the highway with the recycled mix

 Compact the mix with a vibrating roller

 Finish the layer with a rubber tire roller

The recycler mills the pavement down to a preset depth, mixing it with the cement that was deposited on the road. Heated water and emulsifier are added by computer-controlled sprayers. This expands the emulsifier and adds the water required to cure the cement. It is mixed well, evenly coating the aggregate milled from the road, then sent to the paver which follows.

The tankers are mechanically coupled with tow bars to the recycler, and placed in neutral. The recycler pushes them along the road maintaining the correct spacing. Compared to traditional rehabilitation, recycling the pavement is a faster, more environmentally friendly process. The train moves at 360 meters per hour, so the crew completes about 3km of a lane per day. Although it may not seem so when we are waiting to pass through the construction zone, there is far less time lost than with traditional rehabilitation. There are far fewer dump trucks servicing the construction, so they don’t impact traffic. The cold process, and less machinery means that less energy is used.

All information and photos supplied by Antonius J.M. Groothuizen.

EDITOR'S COMMENTS: Many thanks to Antonius for sharing this information and process (c/w photos below) with the community of Mount Uniacke and beyond via the Uniacke Newsletter. It should definitely assist in all users of the Highway 1 through Mount Uniacke in understanding the variations and reasons for traffic hold-ups.

To all the users of Highway 1 through Mount Uniacke and to all residents of Mount Uniacke - patience while this long-awaited construction project is "finally" being done. Remember, leave a little earlier than you normally would to go anywhere, smile at the people holding the STOP signs (there for our safety) and think of the positive outcome of all this work rather than the small inconvenience of "wait times" and the "short detours" while the construction continues.

ALSO, IT WOULD BE APPRECIATED BY EVERYONE WHO IS EITHER CONTROLLING TRAFFIC OR SITTING IN THE TRAFFIC IF ANYONE WHO LIVES IN LAKELANDS AND BEYOND OR IN SOUTH RAWDON COULD CONTINUE ALONG HWY 101 TO EXIT 4 AND A SHORT DOUBLE-BACK TO AVOID THE CONSTRUCTION SITE AND HELP EVERYONE INVOLVED.

NOTE: photos are in sequence as received from Antonius c/w description.

1. milling the shoulder 2. shoulder removal (material is hauled away and recycled) 3. depositing the cement

4. cold in-place recycling train (right to left: water tanker, emulsion tanker, recycler, paver) 5. a closer look at the recycler 6. vibrating roller

7. rubber tire finishing roller, 8. final inspection

THEY WILL BE BACK FOR THE NEXT STEP: ADDING A LAYER OF FRESH ASPHALT TO SEAL THE HIGHWAY.

NOTE: if you click on the photos they will enlarge for easier viewing.